Categories
Anime Discussions

What’s good and bad about “deep anime?”

DISCUSSION – When I mean “deep anime”, I am referring to anime series that tend to use wordy, complex and metaphorical dialogue and processes that might seem to be a headache for a casual viewers to understand.

After watching the first episode of the anime series, SAGRADA RESET, I was left thinking to myself – “what makes a complex anime series great or bad?

78e

I want to put the Monogatari series as an example for this article. The charm of this anime series is not mainly because of the fighting, the softcore ecchi but the witty, and intelligent remarks the characters give whilst they communicate.

Over the course of time, people have always said that it takes away some sort of realism when a male high school student converse as if he was writing an essay about social norms but that’s just it – this is what makes the anime great. Coupled with great humor, some ecchi, and seriousness, the Monogatari series shaped up to be one of the most head-turning anime series every time they release a new season for it.

The good thing about anime series that tend to go in-depth is that we learn more and more about the world they are in and we can further understand the events unfolding around them.

But an anime series with characters that talk seriously and in-depth doesn’t work if they don’t include one important aspect – how do viewers relate to these characters?
maxresdefault
Sagrada Reset lacked in character depth to be able to appeal to the majority of its viewers for its first episode. The dialogue was interesting and deep coupled with the great usage of metaphors and short moral stories but in the end, it was for naught as these characters were not, in any way, relatable to anyone at all.

It felt like someone wrote an essay about astrophysics and it was read aloud by a toddler. It doesn’t feel, in any way, somewhat real in order for the viewers to relate with these characters. But then again, anime is a story-form based on mostly fiction so it’s not really expected to be real. However, we should at least be able to relate with these characters but the anime series fails to do this in its first episode.

So what’s the bottom-line here?

anime-compilation-3

An anime series can have deep, complex, wordy, and interesting dialogues and characters but in order for it to sell to most people, it should be at least relatable.

Series that pull this off are the Monogatari series, HyoukaOregairu and many more.

These anime series pride themselves in having witty and wordy dialogue, intricate scenarios and premises whilst maintain entertainment by keeping their characters in check.

However in the end, it all comes down to what a person is interested in. Is he/she a casual viewer? Or does he/she long for more deeper and intricate story lines in order to pique his/her interest?

I, for one, am the latter.

I love stories that go deeper and explore ideas that I’ve never thought of before. It makes me think and ponder about how things are possible or not.

What about you? Do you love stories that are more deep and intricate? Or do you prefer stories that cut to the chase with all the actions and the like?

Leave your opinion in the comments below!

Categories
Anime First Looks

First Look: SAGRADA RESET – Episode 1

FIRST LOOK – Sagrada Reset is an anime series set in the seaside town named “Sakurada” where people with special abilities live. However here’s the catch: most of these powers are basically useless, and you lose your powers once you leave the town.

The series centers around two high school students: Kei Asai, who has the ability to remember every thing that has happened to him with his five senses, and Misora Haruki, who has the power to reconstruct every thing to their previous states (at least three days).

Sumire Sona sets them up to meet and intends to have them acquainted with each other for some unknown reason. It could be so that she can use the “reset” ability that Haruki has and use it to her advantage. Despite the complications, Kei Asai still goes through with the his intentions of gaining Haruki’s trust and friendship.

This episode was very much set up to explain every thing there is to know about each character, in regards to their special abilities. The characters seemed too dull as they show little to none humane characteristic. They are all very mysterious which is probably where this series grabbed me.

Most people would not enjoy this anime series. If I were to compare how it feels to watch this series, it would be similar to watching the Endless Eight arc in the anime series “The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya.” It is very mysterious but it gets you thinking.

The thing that I like about this episode is that it prefers to go for deeper levels of communication using metaphors and short stories to relate the current situation to the viewers – which, to a normal and casual viewer, it would be really boring.

It is true that the characters are not all that appealing and show little to no humanity in them at all but come on, this is not the first anime series to have done that with its first episode.

This anime series’ way of pacing itself may not sell to everyone but it does to me. You may not like this series but you will remember it, at least, for its interesting setting and premise.

Judging from the previews for the second episode, we might expect some escalation from the first episode.

Overall, this anime series’ first episode was very dull and it was mostly information-heavy which does not really help selling it to new viewers. However, I am optimistic for the second episode.

At the moment, I am torn whether this will be a good series or not – but hell, I do love an anime series that’s pretty wordy.

If you’ll watch it, don’t set your expectations too high – you’ll be disappointed. Not every anime series appeals to everyone.

I love this anime, is that wrong?

 

Categories
Personal Entries

An interest in anime

PERSONAL ENTRY – When I was five years old, I had an uncle who was obsessed with the Naruto anime series. Every time my mother left me in his care, we’d spend most of the idle time watching a few episodes of it. I remember him talking excitedly about everything that was happening in an episode, whether it was a fight, a conversation or something that caught his attention.

Even my mother and I had some times when she’d pull out her collection of Voltron episodes. It was a fun time seeing these different robots fighting other robots – the action, the lights, the clashes. They were all something new for me.

I could say that my love for anime is sort of hereditary because of my uncle and my mother who both loved anime during their childhood and teenage years.

The first series that I’ve followed, each episode, was the Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya. It was a time where science fiction piqued my interest. The thought of futuristic technology and concepts were so exciting to me. Every episode I’d wonder about the reasons for each scene in an episode. Pretty deep thinking for a seven year old.

The concept where your classmate was, in fact, god and you had to keep her entertained and if not, she’ll destroy the world? That sold me right in.

Another favorite anime series of mine would be Shakugan no Shana. It awakened my love for fantasy and adventure as Shana would go on to be an achieve Flame Haze – one that would make a difference for her world. How one human can be play a great role in a conflict between greater opposing forces than himself.

I was fascinated by the terms: the Reiji Maigo, the magic used, the different weapons – it filled me with awe and enjoyment.

Fast forward to recent years, I have somewhat limited my viewing of certain anime series. Instead of viewing it for the sheer thrill and excitement, I now delve even deeper. Character developments, story developments and twists, complex concepts and settings – I guess this is what happens when you learn more as you grow.

Nowadays, anime series have been more prevalent on re-occurring themes. Most spend less time on depth and are to shallow for me to enjoy. Instead of the usual twenty-five or more episodes in a season, we’ve now gone to common twelve-episode cour.

A lot of things have changed in the anime industry and people as a whole to have caused these things. It’s stretched itself to even foreign audiences other than Japan.

It’s a sense of happiness yet there’s a feeling of uncertainty – how anime has become bigger than people have expected.

Despite the new tropes and ideas, I still do hope we get to see more Haruhi’s, more Shakugan no Shana’s, more Naruto’s, more Voltron’s – where the entertainment value matters on the audience’s relation to the anime series rather than flashy CGI and the sorts.

Miandro