Categories
Anime

Why anime doesn’t work in live-action film adaptations

DISCUSSION – As of late, various anime series have gotten really popular to the point that they have been adapted into many media forms. While this is certainly a sign that anime has gone global and is being adored by an even diverse, bigger audience, there are some problems.

Why do we love an anime series? One of the main reasons why is the storyline. When things get adapted into a new media form, there are some changes needed to be done to make the story “work” in the media form it is being adapted into.

For example, let’s say we have a successful visual novel like Clannad. In a visual novel, the reader gets to choose what path the main character takes thus changing the events, relationships, and the like in a story.

What if during your walk-through of the Clannad visual novel, you chose to end up with Ryou – one of the main heroines of the game. Sure, we could have that in the anime adaptation but what about the rest of the gals? How would the story pan out? Would it be appealing to you, the viewer?

Before the anime adaptation is set into motion, things have to be changed in regards to the story and character development since we can’t have every single route of a visual novel adapted into anime – otherwise, it would’ve been a harem.

Same goes with a live-action film adaptation, it needs to work with the media form and its intended audience.

In the Hollywood film, Edge of Tomorrow, where Tom Cruise played as the main character, the director based the film on the 2004 light novel All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka.

In this film, the planet Earth is under invasion by alien species called Mimics. However, these alien species and their appearances are very different from the manga and light novel adaptations of All You Need Is Kill.

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In the manga adaptation, the mimics appeared as some sort of spherical floating creatures resembling that of bacteria. However, in the Hollywood film, they have changed their appearances to some sort of cunning wolves of metal and electricity. Instead of floating, they are fast objects that would kill you in a heartbeat before you will even notice.

It is these minor changes that make an adaptation sell. The audience in the West would not have been entertained by floating balls in the sky as the film’s main villains. To make it sell, they needed to give a feeling of thrill and action that would be familiar to a western audience.

The reason why live-action film adaptations of anime fail to live up to expectations is because they are too reliant on the original source. Directors need to understand the source material of the anime they are adapting then change some minor details so that it would actually work in a film media platform.

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Let’s take Death Note, for example. Seriously do we actually need to fit every detail of a character’s description from the anime series? I mean, it doesn’t make sense when it becomes a live-action film adaptation. It does not give appeal and it is just downright cringe or hilarious watching this.

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And we’ve got a CGI-Shinigami in the live-action film… Seriously, it is just too cringe and hilarious that probably most viewers wouldn’t even take this film seriously.

We could’ve gotten a human who could fill Ryuk’s role, yeah? Hell, we could have Tom Hiddleston play as Ryuk or whatever name change we could do to fit a more global audience.

The bottom-line here is that most live-action film adaptations of anime and manga stick too much to the original work without consideration if the actual film will come out good or not. There are some anime and manga that won’t work if you adapt it as it is. That’s why we call it an “adaptation” – to adapt something from its original media form in order to appeal more audiences.

What about you? Do you think all live-action film adaptations of anime and manga need to follow the original work? Or do you think people working on the film need to understand their based storyline more clearly?

Categories
Anime News

New stunning CM for Violet Evergarden

NEWS – Kyoto Animation recently released a new promotional video for their upcoming anime series, “Violet Evergarden.” The video does not show new information but we do get to see more of the studio’s stunning work.

 

“I will run as fast as I can to wherever my customer desires. I am the Auto Memories Doll, Violet Evergarden.” – Violet Evergarden (at the end of the video)

There is still no exact date announced for Violet Evergarden so we will have to wait longer. Considering the animation quality of the promotional videos done by Kyoto Animation so far, it would not be too surprising that the series would still be in the works. After all, the level of quality has to remain consistent otherwise the whole series would be bad.

As far as the little information I have gathered regarding the anime series, here is a brief synopsis:

Auto Memories Doll.

It’s been quite a while since that name caused a fuss. Originally invented by Professor Orland solely for his beloved wife, Auto Memories Dolls eventually spread out into the world, and a machine that allows people to rent out the dolls was also created.

“I will run as fast as I can to wherever my customer desires. I am the Auto Memories Doll, Violet Evergarden.”

A girl who almost appears to have popped out of a fairy tale with her blonde hair and blue eyes said this with her inorganic beauty and sweet voice.

The promotional videos, so far, were worked by the following staff:

Director/Storyboard: Taichi Ishidate (Kyoukai no Kanata)
Character Design/Animation Director: Akiko Takase
Key Animators: Nami Iwasaki, Fumio Tada, Kohei Okamura, Shinpei Sawa, Nobuaki Maruki, Tatsuya Sato, Miku Kadowaki
In-Between Animation Check: Hiroko Kuroda
Color Design: Yūka Yoneda
Special Effects: Rina Miura
Background Art: Mikiko Watanabe
3D Art: Joji Unoguchi
Director of Digital Composite: Kōhei Funamoto
3D Computer Graphics: Tetsuro Umetsu

It is still unclear whether these people will be working the anime series itself.

On a personal note: *suppressed fanboy screaming*