Long Gone Days: an RPG focusing on the emotional aspect of war

FIRST LOOK – Long Gone Days is a character-driven RPG inspired by dystopian literature, but set in our present timeline, showing real countries.

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The game focuses on Rourke, a sniper from the Core, an isolated nation below the surface of the Earth. Just like his brothers, Rourke has been trained as a soldier ever since he was born and his knowledge is strictly relating to his job – nothing else.

As he executes his first operation, he realizes that there is something a-miss with his superiors’ objectives. He takes the decision to desert from the operation, not realizing the consequences of his actions.

Upon playing the demo version of this game, I must say that it was really something. The game shows a new focus on RPG – rather than leveling up, doing quests, collecting loot and the like, it focuses on the characters and their interactions with the world around them.

The story may not be something new but it’s how it is carried out or shown through the gameplay that makes it something unique for the RPG genre.

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It still has the usual turn-based battling system that is all too familiar for an RPG but what’s new here is we have a “sniper mode” battle. Since Rourke is a sniper in his squad, we get to control and aim our targets – shooting them from a considerably safe distance as much as a real sniper would do.

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Whilst in a turn based battle, instead of picking your targets as you would in a generic RPG, you get to choose which points of the target’s body you are going to shoot at. Each portion, whether it’d be the torso, head, legs, allows you to deal damage and accuracy depending on where you shoot.

Unlike most RPGs, there are no levels so no need to grind XP or something of the sort. Instead of levels, you will be customizing your party member’s weapons, skills, and adding new items for them to use.

Here’s another great and unique feature – morale. In order to make sure your party members fight to their highest abilities, you have to interact with them to keep their morale up so choose your words carefully. Whatever you say to your party members in battle may affect their performance.

Another interesting and unique feature is the NPCs. In order to interact with some of the NPCs, you have to gain the acquaintance of a party member who speaks the NPC’s native language. If the NPC is speaking Russian, then you’re going to need a party member to interact with said NPC. It brings the whole scenario real as being a soldier who’s just deserted in the middle of a war and you’ve got to use every asset you get.

The language barriers are a great and unique challenge for the player as they complete objectives and gain new items.

Also, every skill uses technology and science. No magic here, folks, we are set in a war where your skills will be throwing a grenade, an incendiary round or something similar.

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The art style is very different from usual RPGs. Although it still uses pixel art, the textures are very detailed, an excellent use of color. The cut scenes are smooth and look almost like it came from an anime film. The character sprites are well done, as well.

The game, Long Gone Days, is being developed by two people: Camila Gormaz (Director, Artist, Dev) and Paolo Videla (Writer, Game Design).

It is expected to release on the first quarter of 2018.

A demo version is available on Steam, in case you wanted to have a look on this interesting, upcoming RPG game.

If you want more updates and information on this game, visit their site. You can also check our their twitter account, if that’s better for you.

Despite their Indiegogo funding campaign ended on August 2016, the InDemand feature is on, meaning that you can still keep backing the development by pledging. Besides that, you can show your support to this game by sharing related articles, Facebook posts and tweets.

[images from Long Gone Days site]

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